D’Addario Guitar Strings Set, Chromes, Jazz Light Reviews

Sunday, October 5, 2014
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D’Addario Guitar Strings Set, Chromes, Jazz Light

D'Addario Guitar Strings Set, Chromes, Jazz Light

  • D’Addario’s best selling flatwounds offers balance of smooth feel and warm, mellow tone
  • “Ribbon” wound and polished for ultra-smooth feel and warm, mellow tone
  • String Gauges; Plain steel .011, .015, Nickel Wound .022, .030, .040, .050
  • Corrosion resistant packaging for fresh strings, always!
  • Made in the U.S.A. for the highest quality and performance

D’Addario Chromes Flatwound Electric Guitar strings are famed for their smooth feel and warm, mellow tone. The strings are wound and then polished to produce an incredibly smooth surface.

List Price: $ 27.15

Price: $ 5.34

3 SETS ERNIE BALL 2003 EARTHWOOD MED LIGHT ACOUSTIC GUITAR STRINGS 12-54 (3PACK)

$13.88
End Date: Saturday Mar-17-2018 9:08:35 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $13.88
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Ernie Ball Super Slinky Nickel Wound Electric Guitar Strings 9-42 2223 3 Sets
$11.99
End Date: Monday Mar-19-2018 9:45:25 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $11.99
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3 Responses to “D’Addario Guitar Strings Set, Chromes, Jazz Light Reviews”

  1. 1
    Michael J. Edelman Says:

    28 of 28 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Excellent sound and long lasting, October 5, 2011
    By 
    Michael J. Edelman (Huntington Woods, MI USA) –
    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)
      
    (VINE VOICE)
      

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    Thee only flatwound strings I’ve tried that sound significantly better than these are the Thomastiks, which cost twice as much, and they’re not twice as good. Maybe if I was a working pro I’d buy the Thomastiks, but for me, the D’Addarios sound good, and last a long time.

    If you’ve never played flatwounds, you might be surprised to discover that they far outlast round wound strings. That’s because what kills the sound of strings is gunk from your fingers and the air getting in between the windings and damping the vibration. Back when guitar strings were more a lot more expensive, it wasn’t that unusual to remove strings, boil them, and put them back on. Some electric bassists still do this.) With flats, the gunk doesn’t get in between the wraps, and if you don’t break a string you can play a set for months.

    I have different guitars set up with different strings ranging from .010s (my Fenders) to .013 (my archtop.) Rockers playing .010s and .009s might be intimidated by .013s, but they’re not that much harder to play, and after a little practice it’s easy. Jazzers seldom if ever play six-string bar chords or bend strings, which means you just don’t need that much muscle anyway. Flatwounds are also generally set with a fairly low action. They don’t vibrate as widely as roundwounds, so they don’t need as much clearance.

    If you’re looking for that classic electric jazz guitar sound, flats are the way to go, and the D’Addarios are as good as you need. (Rockers looking for that 60s sound might try the D’Addario flatwound .010s. Almost the same sound as the Pyramids, and a lot cheaper.)

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  2. 2
    Jorge Barbarosa "the_bassist" Says:

    15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    No Squeaking, January 28, 2005
    By 

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    Flatwound? Ribbon wound? It’s all the same, no squeak, slick, jazzer mellow in tone. It’s a sound that many would like to acheive. But why not round wounds? Round wounds give a bit of grip, round wounds also have more surface area and are louder. Okay, but I have a pickup, want the mellower tone, sans finger noise. It’s important for my playing to not have finger noise.

    I have the Les Paul for harder edged music, but the archtop jazzbox pleads for a mellower tone, hence the flats.

    I have a couple of friends who are really great Jazz guitar stylists, they both use D’Addario Chromes – over nickel, so I thought I would try them out. Nice, buttery smooth and I couldn’t really recognized the difference over nickel flats, except the price, and the wear seemed a bit better.

    Wear and tear is not really a factor for me, as I change out strings every 3 to 6 weeks depending on how much I’m playing.

    Not ready to take the plunge? It is a different feel, if not, try half rounds. They’re a hybrid of both, less finger noise, a bit more surface area, hence output. Output is not a problem if you are amplified.

    Check them out. I use the medium gauge, with a 13 high E, the G is wound also. Finger style or with a heavy Dunlap tortex pick, the attack noise is also reduced with the flats. I like them alot.

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  3. 3
    Mark Pemburn "IT Consultant" Says:

    10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Great for surf tone, May 3, 2009
    By 

    I’ve been using D’Addario Chromes for about 10 years and, for my money, they are the perfect string for the “surf” sound on a Fender Jaguar. The .012-.050 gauge is heavy enough to stabilize the Jag’s bridge and prevent the annoying rattle that can crop up with lighter strings. The flat wound profile is easier on the fingers and provides a better platform for tremolo picking and glissandos. They also maintain their ring and crispness for a good long time, so I get more “miles” between string changes. Highly recommended

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